Monday, March 20, 2017

Бодлогын өгөгдөхүүн

Few places seem to matter less for the West than Mongolia. Policy makers in Ulaanbaatar have tried hard over the years to develop their “third neighbour” policy in a bid to escape the hard geographic reality of being perpetually sandwiched between two great powers, China and Russia. However, there are few buyers in the West for the role of Mongolia’s “overseas neighbour.” The Bush Administration at least kept an eye on this sparsely populated expanse of territory the size of Western Europe (Bush even turned up in Mongolia in 2005 for an unprecedented, if short, visit). Under Obama, the country has simply disappeared off Washington’s radar. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton has not even looked that way on any one of her frequent Asian blitz-tours. And who cares? After all, Mongolia is basically peripheral to Western political and economic interests. Even BBC World News, in a recent online piece, confused the country with China-administered Inner Mongolia.
"Mongolia between Russia and China" by Sergey Radchenko

Let’s face it, Mongolia is the end of the earth as far as they’re concerned. Here is a country which when I went there was the largest land-locked country in the world. In the United States, it would stretch from New York to Denver, from Minneapolis to Dallas, with a population of two and a half million people. It is the least densely populated country in the world. And between Russia and China. How much more forgotten and obscure can you be in terms of the rest of the world?
Secretary Baker played such a key role” by Ambassador Joseph Lake